Suspense author C.J. Box and his signature cowboy hat stopped SLCL last night to discuss his latest thriller, “Stone Cold.” Mr. Box said one of the advantages of book tours is the ability to travel around the country, then later he can set murders in the places he visits. His new book features the unexplained disappearance of a brewer from St. Louis.
The popular Joe Pickett books are currently being optioned for TV. Mr. Box said he wasn’t sure what actor would play Joe, but the series features Robert Redford as Executive Producer.
See more pictures from the event here. Get the full line-up of spring author events at SLCL here.

Suspense author C.J. Box and his signature cowboy hat stopped SLCL last night to discuss his latest thriller, “Stone Cold.” Mr. Box said one of the advantages of book tours is the ability to travel around the country, then later he can set murders in the places he visits. His new book features the unexplained disappearance of a brewer from St. Louis.

The popular Joe Pickett books are currently being optioned for TV. Mr. Box said he wasn’t sure what actor would play Joe, but the series features Robert Redford as Executive Producer.

See more pictures from the event here. Get the full line-up of spring author events at SLCL here.

Author J.A. Jance, known for her blood-pumping thrillers, gave a rather humorous talk at Library HQ last night. She shared how when she first enrolled in writing classes in 1964 at the University of Arizona, the professor wouldn’t let her in because she was a girl. Jance got revenge though, by having one of the crazed killers in her novels be a former UA professor. The lesson here was “if you have friends or relatives who are budding mystery writers, don’t make them mad.”
See more photos from the event here. Get the full listing of spring author events here. 

Author J.A. Jance, known for her blood-pumping thrillers, gave a rather humorous talk at Library HQ last night. She shared how when she first enrolled in writing classes in 1964 at the University of Arizona, the professor wouldn’t let her in because she was a girl. Jance got revenge though, by having one of the crazed killers in her novels be a former UA professor. The lesson here was “if you have friends or relatives who are budding mystery writers, don’t make them mad.”

See more photos from the event here. Get the full listing of spring author events here

Over 300 people turned out to hear Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie discuss her new novel at St. Louis County Library last night. This, compared to her last visit to St. Louis 10 years ago, when only two people showed up and they just went to dinner instead.

Ms. Adichie read from her new book, “Americanah” and took questions from the audience. Someone asked how much of the book is her story, Adichie said she used some of her own experiences, as well as stories from friends, but in the end, the tale is its own thing, “it’s not my story, because my life is quite boring.” Another person asked if Adichie felt like she was “looking in” when she goes home to Nigeria, having lived in the U.S.  Ms. Adichie said yes, but it’s more because she’s a storyteller, and has always been that way–removed from everyone else, because she’s looking for elements to use in a story.

See more photos from the event here. Get the full SLCL spring author calendar here.

Novelist Alice Hoffman described her newest book, “The Museum of Extraordinary Things,” as a love letter to New York City. The book is a tribute of sorts to the love/hate (but mostly love) relationship that people have with the city. Hoffman reminisced about her journey to becoming a writer. In college, one of her professors sent a story she’d written to an editor friend, who in turn, asked if she had a novel. Hoffman said yes, and promptly sat down to start writing it. Six months later, she had her first book, which was eventually picked up and published.

Don’t miss another author event at SLCL–get the full spring schedule here

Journalist Lee Sandlin, author of “Storm Kings,” wasted no time in telling the audience what to do if you find yourself in the path of a tornado. Sandlin, who grew up fascinated by tornadoes, shattered some myths about the powerful storms that are being studied now as never before. Radio’s McGraw Milhaven interviewed Mr. Sandlin and fielded the audience’s questions.
SLCL’s spring author series is underway, get the full schedule here.

Journalist Lee Sandlin, author of “Storm Kings,” wasted no time in telling the audience what to do if you find yourself in the path of a tornado. Sandlin, who grew up fascinated by tornadoes, shattered some myths about the powerful storms that are being studied now as never before. Radio’s McGraw Milhaven interviewed Mr. Sandlin and fielded the audience’s questions.

SLCL’s spring author series is underway, get the full schedule here.

Thanks to all who helped us celebrate Black History Month! Here are some of our favorite photos. Events included a storytelling, a book signing with Ayana Mathis, a gospel concert and a performance by the Black Rep. 

Memoirist Kenan Trebinčević began his reading at SLCL last night by saying “I hold grudges. But then again, I guess I have reason to.” The author was in town to promote his new book, “The Bosnia List: A Memoir of War, Exile and Return.” Trebinčević talked about his experiences in Bosnia, when friends and neighbors, practically over night, turned on his family in the early ’90s. His family eventually made it to the U.S. in 1993–they arrived in Connecticut with about $300.
The process of writing the book didn’t make Trebinčević’s grudges go away, but it helped him make sense of it, and “turn the worst experience of my life into something beautiful.”
SLCL’s spring author series is in full swing, get the full line-up here. 

Memoirist Kenan Trebinčević began his reading at SLCL last night by saying “I hold grudges. But then again, I guess I have reason to.” The author was in town to promote his new book, “The Bosnia List: A Memoir of War, Exile and Return.” Trebinčević talked about his experiences in Bosnia, when friends and neighbors, practically over night, turned on his family in the early ’90s. His family eventually made it to the U.S. in 1993–they arrived in Connecticut with about $300.

The process of writing the book didn’t make Trebinčević’s grudges go away, but it helped him make sense of it, and “turn the worst experience of my life into something beautiful.”

SLCL’s spring author series is in full swing, get the full line-up here

Journalist Geoff Dyer discussed his book “The Contest of the Century” about the rivalry between the U.S. and China last night at SLCL. Dyer was careful to note we’re not in the midst of a new cold war, but are instead engaged in a game of chess with China. It’s not a struggle, which is why he used the word “competition” in the book title. The author talked about ways in which the Chinese are trying to make their move, and decisions the U.S. could make to ensure it stays on top.
Don’t miss another author event at SLCL, get the full schedule here. 

Journalist Geoff Dyer discussed his book “The Contest of the Century” about the rivalry between the U.S. and China last night at SLCL. Dyer was careful to note we’re not in the midst of a new cold war, but are instead engaged in a game of chess with China. It’s not a struggle, which is why he used the word “competition” in the book title. The author talked about ways in which the Chinese are trying to make their move, and decisions the U.S. could make to ensure it stays on top.

Don’t miss another author event at SLCL, get the full schedule here

Gymnastics and story time…what a perfect combo! Kids at the Sachs Branch were treated to an hour of stories, music and movement courtesy of folks at Team Central Gymnastics. Interested in finding a Gymnastic Story Time near you? Check our events calendar

Author Michael Hainey discussed his touching new memoir “After Visiting Friends: A Son’s Story” at SLCL last night. The book recounts his search for the truth about his father’s mysterious death. An audience member asked if, having written the book, he had a sense of completion. Hainey said that the book may be done, but the story isn’t over: “People may be gone, but they never leave us.” He also said that working on the book allowed him to see his father man to man, instead of through the eyes of a child. Hainey’s mother described the book as “the most beautiful gift you could have given me.”

Find information about upcoming authors events at SLCL right here